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Los Angeles is a moderately walkable city in Los Angeles County with a Walk Score of 67. Los Angeles is home to approximately 3,787,000 people and 1,678,570 jobs.

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the second-largest city in the United States after New York City, the most populous city in the state of California, and the county seat of Los Angeles County.



Overview of Los Angeles Real Estate Trends
Calculated using last month's statistics:

Median List Price $900K

Avg. Sale / List 99.0%

Median List $/Sq Ft $542

Median Sale Price$ 745K

Avg. Down Payment 21.7%

Median Sale $/Sq Ft $474

Number of Homes Sold 1805


LIVING IN LOS ANGELES

Los Angeles is an enormous coastal city (i.e. on the ocean, a bay, or inlet) located in the state of California. With a population of 3,990,456 people and 1061 constituent neighborhoods, Los Angeles is the largest community in California.

Housing costs in Los Angeles are among some of the highest in the nation, although real estate prices here don't compare to real estate prices in the most expensive communities in California.

Los Angeles is neither predominantly blue-collar nor white-collar, instead having a mixed workforce of both blue-collar and white-collar jobs. Overall, Los Angeles is a city of professionals, sales and office workers, and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Los Angeles who work in office and administrative support (12.08%), sales jobs (10.46%), and management occupations (9.55%).

Of important note, Los Angeles is also a city of artists. Los Angeles has more artists, designers and people working in media than 90% of the communities in America. This concentration of artists helps shape Los Angeles’s character.

Los Angeles is a popular destination for single career-starters. One thing that you will notice when you are out and about town is that there is a large population of people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters out at restaurants, listening to live music, and enjoying other activities. They are a real visible part of the culture of Los Angeles. This makes Los Angeles a good place to live for young professionals. With so many people in this demographic, Los Angeles presents many opportunities for single professionals to enjoy themselves, socialize, and to create lasting relationships.

One of the nice things about Los Angeles is that it is nautical, which means that parts of it are somewhat historic and touch the ocean or tidal bodies of water, such as inlets and bays. Because of this, visitors and locals will often go to these areas to take in the scenery or to enjoy waterfront activities.

One downside of living in Los Angeles is that it can take a long time to commute to work. In Los Angeles, the average commute to work is 31.83 minutes, which is quite a bit higher than the national average. On the other hand, local public transit is widely used in the city, so leaving the car at home and taking transit is often a viable alternative.

Los Angeles is a big city, and with that comes lots of benefits. One benefit is that most big cities have public transit, but Los Angeles really shines when it comes to the extensiveness and use of its public transit system. More than most large American cities, Los Angeles citizens use public transit daily to get to and from work. And while there are transportation options, most people in Los Angeles ride the bus. Whereas in some cities one is destined to sit in traffic every morning to get to work and every evening to get home, in Los Angeles a lot leave their cars at home (if they even choose to own one), and hop a ride on the bus.

The overall education level of Los Angeles citizens is substantially higher than the typical US community, as 33.02% of adults in Los Angeles have at least a bachelor's degree, and the average American community has 21.84%.

The per capita income in Los Angeles in 2010 was $31,563, which is middle income relative to California, and upper middle income relative to the rest of the US. This equates to an annual income of $126,252 for a family of four. However, Los Angeles contains both very wealthy and poor people as well.

Los Angeles is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Los Angeles home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. People of Hispanic or Latino origin are the most prevalent group in Los Angeles, accounting for 48.68% of the city’s residents (people of Hispanic or Latino origin can be of any race). The greatest number of Los Angeles residents report their race to be White, followed by Asian. Important ancestries of people in Los Angeles include German, Irish, English, Italian, and Russian.

Foreign born people are also an important part of Los Angeles's cultural character, accounting for 37.59% of the city’s population.

The most common language spoken in Los Angeles is Spanish. Other important languages spoken here include English and Korean.

If you pride yourself on having a palette for satisfying, tasty high-end cuisine, you will probably enjoy the highly-rated restaurants in Los Angeles, including kosher, pizza and Persian. With a range of nightlife venues here, there is always something going on that will keep you entertained. Youll never be bored living here as there is always something going on in venues such as cinemas, performing arts spots and music halls. Jump start your fun here here after work and on weekends thanks to the wide variety of activities that you can partake in such as surfing, training at fitness centers and going to summer camps. If you like shopping at luggage stores, art galleries and bespoke tailors, youre in luck because the stores selling a huge variety of products are just a short distance away. Public transportation in this city will ease your commute and benefit you and your neighbors by leaving your cars at home.

Many inhabitants in Los Angeles do not own the place they live in, with many of the places having recently been confirmed to meet rental property standards.

Real estate prices rose 3.5 percent between last year and this year, Los Angeless average listing price is now $628,699. At the same time, inventory decreased slightly year-over-year in this locale by 4.7 percent, reaching a total of 2,216 homes on the market in this year. The granite countertops found in some of this citys homes will be long lasting even for a busy family and will remain beautiful and elegant for years to come. Homes in Los Angeles often have both ocean and mountain views; a stunning combination that can be found in very few places in the world. Various houses in this city incorporate walk-in closets which are ideal for people who want to store their belongings in an orderly fashion.
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  • Crenshaw
  • Leimert Park
  • South Los Angeles
  • View Park
  • Windsor Hills
  • Crenshaw


    Overview of Crenshaw Real Estate Trends

    Calculated using last month's statistics

    Median List Price $826K

    Avg. Sale / List 100.0%

    Median List $/Sq Ft $579

    Median Sale Price $1.22M

    Avg. Down Payment 20.0%

    Median Sale $/Sq Ft $591

    Crenshaw, or the Crenshaw District, is a neighborhood in South Los Angeles, California.

    In the post-World War II era, a Japanese-American community was established in Crenshaw. African-Americans started migrating to the district in the mid 1960s, and by the early 1970s were the majority.

    The Crenshaw Boulevard commercial corridor has had many different cultural backgrounds throughout the years, but it is still "the heart of African American commerce in Los Angeles".

    Geography

    The neighborhood of Baldwin Hills is to the south, Baldwin Village is to the west, and Leimert Park is to the east. According to Google Maps, the Crenshaw neighborhood is centered on Crenshaw Boulevard and Buckingham Road.

    Demographics

    In the post-World War II era, a Japanese-American community was established in Crenshaw. There was an area Japanese school called Dai-Ichi Gakuen. Due to a shared sense of being discriminated against, many of the Japanese-Americans had close relationships with the African-American community.

    At its peak, it was one of the largest Japanese-American settlements in California, with about 8,000 residents around 1970, and Dai-Ichi Gakuen had a peak of 700 students.

    Beginning in the 1970s the Japanese American community began decreasing in size and Japanese-American businesses began leaving. Scott Shibya Brown stated that "some say" the effect was a "belated response" to the 1965 Watts riots and that "several residents say a wave of anti-Japanese-American sentiment began cropping up in the area, prompting further departures." Eighty-two-year-old Jimmy Jike was quoted in the Los Angeles Times in 1993, stating that it was mainly because the residents' children, after attending universities, moved away.
     
    By 1980, there were 4,000 Japanese ethnic residents, half of the previous size. By 1990 there were 2,500 Japanese-Americans, mostly older residents. By 1993, the community was diminishing in size, with older Japanese Americans staying but with younger ones moving away. That year, Dai-Ichi Gakuen had 15 students. Recently there has been a shift in a new generation of Japanese Americans moving back into the neighborhood.

    Education

    Public schools are operated by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD).

    Schools

    Crenshaw High School, which is south of Martin Luther King Boulevard and east of Crenshaw Boulevard, is the local public high school.
    The district's charter schools in the area include the KIPP network. KIPP Academy of Opportunity

    Celerity Nascent Charter School[
    the New Design Charter School (built in 2004)
    View Park Preparatory High School
    View Park Preparatory Middle School.

    Neighborhood

    Crenshaw is a largely residential neighborhood of single-story houses, bungalows and low-rise condominiums and apartments. There are also commercial buildings with an industrial corridor along Jefferson Boulevard. There are also several other commercial districts throughout the neighborhood.

    After courts ruled segregation covenants to be unconstitutional, the area opened up to other races. A large Japanese American settlement ensued, which can still be found along Coliseum Street, east and west of Crenshaw Boulevard. African Americans started migrating to the district in the mid 1960s, and by the early 1970s later were the majority.

    In the 1970s, Crenshaw, Leimert Park and neighboring areas together had formed one of the largest African-American communities in the western United States. Crenshaw had suffered significant damage from both the 1992 Los Angeles riots and the 1994 Northridge earthquake but was able to rebound in the late 2000s with the help of redevelopment and gentrification.

    In 2006, the population of Crenshaw was around 27,600. Currently, there is a huge demographic shift increased in where many middle and lower-class blacks and Latinos are migrating to cities in the Inland Empire as well as cities in the Antelope Valley sections of Southern California as a form of gentrification. The gentrification process continues into 2010's as the Crenshaw mall been approved for a major renovation plan, that will include apartments, shops, and more restaurants.

    Notable places

    Historic Village Green

    Googie architecture of the former Holiday Bowl in 2002 before converting into a Starbucks
    Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza shopping mall is a landmark. It was home to a tri-level Wal-Mart (formerly a Broadway department store, then later a JJ Newberry's), Sears and Macy's. Additional retail stores later were purchased by the mall such as Victoria's Secret, Forever 21, and Ashley Stewart, as well as office supply stores such as Staples.

    Marlton Square, (formerly known as Santa Barbara Plaza), was a shopping center. The center had aged over the years and was a failed redevelopment project. Local city business developers and Kaiser Permanente purchased the land and demolished the old retail stores in 2011. A new Kaiser Permanente medical office building was built on the site.

    The Crenshaw Square Shopping Centre and sign, a local landmark, had been in some disrepair throughout the years. In 2007, the sign was replaced by a modern illuminated red-and-green sign. The Crenshaw Square outdoor shopping center was sold in 2015 and underwent a significant renovation in 2016.

    The West Angeles Church of God in Christ, a Pentecostal church near the intersection of Crenshaw and Exposition boulevards, is home to Bishop Charles E. Blake.

    Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monuments

    Village Green is a neighborhood near Baldwin Hills. It is Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #174.

    The Holiday Bowl was a bowling alley and café known for being a center of ethnic diversity during the 1960s and 1970s. It featured a sushi bar known as the Sakiba Lounge with live musical acts. Its historic Modernist Googie architecture style has been refurbished by the buildings new tenants, Starbucks and Walgreens, along with a newly outdoor shopping center that opened in early 2006. It is City of Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument #688.

    Media
    Motion picture

    John Singleton's 1991 film Boyz n the Hood is a story set in Crenshaw. It was filmed in the Crenshaw neighborhood and other South Central (as it was called then; now called South Los Angeles) Los Angeles locations. It was Singleton's directorial debut and received Oscar nominations for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay at the 64th Academy Awards.

    Notable people

    Tom Bradley, former mayor of Los Angeles
    Darwin Cook, National Basketball Association
    Baron Davis, National Basketball Association
    Eric Davis, Major League Baseball
    Richard Elfman and Danny Elfman, musicians
    Tremaine Fowlkes, National Basketball Association
    James Hahn, former mayor of Los Angeles
    Kenneth Hahn, (1920–1997) Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors
    Nipsey Hussle, (1985-2019) rapper, entrepreneur, community activist
    Ice-T, musician and actor
    DeSean Jackson, National Football League
    Dom Kennedy, rapper
    Kurupt, rapper
    Arthur Lee, singer
    Lords of Lyrics, rap group
    Skee-Lo, rapper
    Darryl Strawberry, Major League Baseball
    Syd, singer and producer
    De'Anthony Thomas, National Football League
    Pam Ward, novelist

  • Leimert Park


    The asking price of homes for sale in Leimert Park has since January last year, while the number of homes for sale has 

    Overview of Leimert Park Real Estate Trends

    Calculated using last month's statistics.

    Median List Price $892K

    Avg. Sale / List 97.7%

    Median List $/Sq Ft $528

    Avg. Number of Offers 12

    Median Sale Price $642K

    Avg. Down Payment 20.7%

    Median Sale $/Sq Ft $544

    Average Home Prices Near Leimert Park

    Nearby Neighborhoods

    Ladera Heights $1,487,000
    Baldwin Hills $1,080,000
    Inglewood $649,950
    West Adams $850,000
    Windsor Hills $900,000
    Crenshaw $825,799

    Leimert Park (/ləˈmɜːrt/; lə-MURT) is a neighborhood in the South Los Angeles region of Los Angeles, California. Developed in the 1920s as a mainly residential community, it features Spanish Colonial Revival homes and tree-lined streets with a central commercial area and an eponymous park that has remained central to the community. It has become the center of both historical and contemporary African-American art, music, and culture in Los Angeles.

    Geography

    Location

    Jefferson Park flanks Leimert Park to the north, the Exposition Park neighborhood and Vermont Square are to the east, Hyde Park to the south and View Park-Windsor Hills and Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw to the west. Leimert Park angles to the West Adams district on the northwest.

    Leimert Park is bounded by Exposition Boulevard on the north, South Van Ness Avenue and Arlington Avenue on the east, West Vernon Avenue on the south, and Victoria Avenue and Crenshaw Boulevard on the west.According to Google Maps, the boundary is Crenshaw Boulevard on the west, Exposition Boulevard on the north, West Vernon Avenue on the south, and Western Avenue on the east.

    History

    Leimert Park Theater, then known as the Watchtower Theatre, 1973
    Leimert Park is named for its developer, Walter H. Leimert, who began the subdivision business center project in 1928. He had the master plan designed by the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm managed by the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted (1822–1903), the landscape designer known for Central Park in New York City and other major projects. Leimert Park was one of the first comprehensively planned communities in Southern California to be designed for upper and middle-income families.
     
    It was considered a model of urban planning for its time: automobile traffic near schools and churches was minimized, utility wires were buried or hidden from view in alleys, and densely planted trees lined its streets. Walter Leimert envisioned a self-sufficient commercial district community, with a town square, movie theater, transportation, and retail shopping. Leimert Park was considered a desirable community, and one of the first to have a Home Owners' Association (HOA).

    April 21, 2019 marks the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Vision Theatre (initially named the Leimert Park Theatre). This Mediterranean Revival Style theater is located at the south end of Leimert Park Village at 3341 West Forty-Third place and Degnan Avenue.
     
    It was designed in 1931 by the architectural firm Morgan, Walls & Clements, and opened as a movie theater on April 21, 1932.

    In 1977 the theater became a Jehovah's Witness Chapel known as the Watchtower. Actress Marla Gibbs bought the theater in 1990 and renamed it the Vision Theatre, intending to make it a venue for African-American movies, live theater, and dance productions.
     
    In 1992 the LA civil unrest and an economic recession hit the area hard, and the property fell into foreclosure. The City of Los Angeles acquired the theater in 1999. The Department of Cultural Affairs manages the theater with the goal of providing a performing arts venue for professional performing arts presentations; a training center for talent reflective of South Los Angeles; and a venue for the production and presentation of world-class theater, music, and dance performances.

    The first phase of renovations to the Vision Theatre have been completed, with upgrades to the lobbies, restrooms, office space, and classrooms in 2011. Currently under construction, Phase II of the renovation began in March 2018. The rehabilitation of the remaining portions of the theater will include the historic refurbishment and expansion of the theater and auditorium, and the addition of an orchestra pit and a fly loft. The grand reopening of the Vision Theatre is planned for 2021.

    The Crenshaw Square Shopping Center was inspired and designed in the style of Japanese architecture. Elderly Japanese-American residents still live in Leimert Park, and some of the Japanese gardens still exist.

    Arts and culture
     
    Leimert Park has been referred to as the center of a contemporary African-American arts scene in Los Angeles.[7] It has been described as "the black Greenwich Village" and in 1998 was seen as "the cultural heartbeat of black Los Angeles."

    The Leimert Park Book Fair began in 2007 and attracts "more than 200 authors, poets, spoken-word artists, storytellers and other participants."

    Entertainment

    Leimert Park has blues and jazz night clubs, theaters for musicals, dramatic performances, award ceremonies, comedy specials, and poetry readings, and venues for hip hop. Project Blowed is the longest-running hip hop open mic in the world, started in 1994 by rapper Aceyalone and friends. It is hosted by Kaos Network, and held every Thursday night at 43rd Place and Leimert Boulevard.

    Leimert Plaza Park

    Leimert Plaza Park is at the district's center park, adjoined by retail shops and the historic Vision Theatre. It is a popular place for live performances and neighborhood gatherings.The cascading fountain has been given landmark status.

    Tavis Smiley, host and producer of National Public Radio (NPR) and the former nationally syndicated talk show Tavis Smiley on PBS, has production studios called The Smiley Group, Inc located within the Leimert Park neighborhood.

    The Lucy Florence Coffee House and Cultural Center was established in Leimert Park in early 1996; it hosted an array of talent, art, restaurant and music. Lucy Florence was located at 3351 West 43rd Street and Degnan Avenue. It was owned by Richard and Ron Harris, also known as the Aswirl Twins on America's Next Top Model. The coffee house was named after their mother Lucy Florence on her 75th birthday; it was then located in the Hollywood neighborhood. In January 2012, Lucy Florence coffee shop closed in Leimert Park.

    Another famous jazz venue is 5th Street Dick's Coffee and Jazz Emporium, founded by Richard Fulton in 1992. Fulton died on March 18, 2000. It continues to be a mainstay for jazz music lovers, professional chess players, poets and famous comedians.

    Education
     
    Leimert Park residents aged 25 and older holding a four-year degree amounted to 55.9% of the population in 2000, about average within the city and the county. A high percentage of residents aged 25 and older had a college education.

    Leimert Park is served by Los Angeles Unified School District. Within Leimert Park are the following schools:

    C.A.T.C.H High School, charter high school, 4120 11th Avenue
    Audubon Middle School, 4120 11th Avenue, LAUSD
    Tom Bradley Global Awareness Magnet, LAUSD alternative, 3875 Dublin Avenue
    Transfiguration Elementary, 4020 Roxton Avenue (private)
    Creative Learning Center Elementary, 1726 West Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (private)
    New Heights Charter Elementary, 2202 West Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (LAUSD)
    Forty-Second Street Elementary, 4231 4th Avenue (LAUSD)

    Recreation and parks

    Leimert Plaza Park is at 4395 Leimert Boulevard, unstaffed, with picnic tables, park bathrooms, benches, decorative water fountain and the under-construction Leimert Park station.
    Pocket Park at Degnan Boulevard and Norton Avenue, unnamed
    People St Plaza, between the Leimert Plaza Park and the Vision Theater on 43rd Place.

    Notable people

    Mark Bradford, artist known for grid-like abstract paintings combining collage with paints.
    Tom Bradley (1917–1998), Los Angeles mayor
    Busdriver, hip-hop artist[20]
    Ray Charles (1930–2004), singer
    Ella Fitzgerald (1917–1996), singer
    Dom Kennedy, rapper
    Carl C. Rasmussen (1901–1952), Los Angeles City Council member




  • South Los Angeles


    South Los Angeles is a region in southern Los Angeles County, California, and mostly lies within the city limits of Los Angeles, just south of downtown.

    Home Prices in South Central LA
    Average over the last month

    $1.21M
    Sale Price
    +162.7% since last year
    $277
    Sale $/Sq. Ft.


    Zip Code Housing Markets
    90043 Housing Market
    90047 Housing Market
    90016 Housing Market
    90019 Housing Market
    90036 Housing Market


    Transportation in South Central LA
    82 / 100
    Very Walkable
    69 / 100
    Good Transit
    85 / 100
    Very Bikeable

    This area is very walkable — most errands can be accomplished on foot. Transit is good, with many nearby public transportation options. It's convenient to use a bike for most trips.

    According to the Los Angeles Times, South Los Angeles (formerly known as South-Central Los Angeles) ”is defined on Los Angeles city maps as a 16-square-mile rectangle with two prongs at the south end.” In 2003, the Los Angeles City Council renamed this area "South Los Angeles".

    The name South Los Angeles can also refer to a larger 51-square mile area that includes areas within the city limits of Los Angeles as well as five unincorporated neighborhoods in the southern portion of the County of Los Angeles.

    Geography
    City of Los Angeles
    The City of Los Angeles delineates South Los Angeles as an area of 15.5 square miles. Adjacent neighborhoods include West Adams, Baldwin Hills, and Leimert Park to the west and the Southeast Los Angeles region of the city (the 26-neighborhood area east of the Harbor Freeway) on the east.

    Los Angeles Times Mapping Project
    According to the Los Angeles Times Mapping Project, South Los Angeles comprises 51 square miles, consisting of 25 neighborhoods within the City of Los Angeles as well as three unincorporated neighborhoods in the County of Los Angeles.

    Districts and neighborhoods
    According to the Mapping L.A. survey of the Los Angeles Times, the South Los Angeles region consists of the following neighborhoods:

    City of Los Angeles

    Adams-Normandie
    Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw
    Broadway-Manchester
    Central-Alameda
    Chesterfield Square
    Exposition Park
    Florence
    Gramercy Park
    Green Meadows
    Harvard Park
    Historic South Central
    Hyde Park
    Jefferson Park
    Leimert Park
    Manchester Square
    Nevin
    South Park
    University Park
    Vermont Knolls
    Vermont Square
    Vermont Vista
    Vermont-Slauson
    Watts
    West Adams
    Westmont


    Notable People From South Los Angeles
     
    Music and entertainment

    Ahmad Jones
    Barry White
    Charles Mingus
    Charles Wright & the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band
    CJ Mac
    Coolio
    Cozz
    Da Lench Mob
    Dom Kennedy
    Eric Dolphy
    Glasses Malone
    Hampton Hawes
    Ice Cube
    Ice-T
    Issa Rae
    Jay Rock
    John Cage, musician
    Johnny "J"
    K-Dee
    Kausion
    Keb' Mo'
    Kevin McCall
    Kurupt
    L.V.
    Meghan Markle
    Montell Jordan
    Murs
    Nipsey Hussle
    O.F.T.B.
    Patrice Rushen
    Ras Kass
    Robin Russell, drummer, member of New Birth/Nite-Liters (band)
    Schoolboy Q
    Scott Shaw
    Sir Jinx
    Skee-Lo
    South Central Cartel
    Spider Loc
    Tiffany Haddish
    Tone Lōc
    Tyrese Gibson
    WC
    Young Maylay
    Etta James
    Ty Dolla $ign (rapper)
    Terrace Martin
    Sports and athletes
    Andre Miller
    Baron Davis
    Darryl Strawberry
    Eddie Murray
    Eric Davis
    Florence Griffith-Joyner
    Ozzie Smith
    Russell Westbrook
    Steve Smith Sr.
    Trayvon Robinson
    Willie Mack
    DeSean Jackson
    Vontaze Burfict
  • View Park


    View Park-Windsor Hills

    Overview of View Park-Windsor Hills Real Estate Trends

    Calculated using last month's statistics.

    Median List Price $1.08M

    Avg. Sale / List 94.2%

    Median List $/Sq Ft $476

    Avg. Number of Offers 1

    Median Sale Price $785K

    Avg. Down Payment 19.0%

    Median Sale $/Sq Ft $458

    The asking price of homes for sale in View Park-Windsor Hills has  since January last year, while the number of homes for sale has decreased 9.5%.

    View Park−Windsor Hills is an unincorporated community in Los Angeles County, California, United States. The View Park neighborhood is on the north end of the community along Angeles Vista Boulevard and the Windsor Hills neighborhood is on the southern end to the north of Slauson Avenue. 

    Zip code: 90043
    Area code: Area code 213
    Population: 11,075 (2010)

    View Park−Windsor Hills is one of the wealthiest primarily African-American neighborhoods in the United States. The two neighborhoods are part of a band of neighborhoods, from Culver City's Fox Hills district on the west to the Los Angeles neighborhood of Leimert Park on the east, that comprise the single largest and one of the wealthiest, best-educated, and geographically contiguous historically black communities in the western United States. This corridor also includes Baldwin Hills and Ladera Heights neighborhoods. It was founded in the late 1930s. While the neighborhood is still predominantly African-American, the area is undergoing a demographic shift, as new homeowners (mostly Caucasian, Asian families), who work in nearby Culver City, Downtown Los Angeles, Santa Monica and other job hub areas are moving into the neighborhood.

    For statistical purposes, the United States Census Bureau has defined View Park−Windsor Hills as a census-designated place (CDP). The census definition of the area may not precisely correspond to local understanding of the area. The population of the CDP was 11,075 at the  U.S. census.

    History

    View Park

    View Park was developed between 1923-1970 as a high-upper-class neighborhood akin to the style of Cheviot Hills, Bel-Air, Brentwood, Carthay Circle, and Studio City by the Los Angeles Investment Company.Along with neighboring Ladera Heights and Baldwin Hills, it is one of the wealthiest African-American areas in the United States. It contains a collection of houses and mansions in the Spanish Colonial and Mediterranean styles, most of which remain today. View Park architecture features the work of many notable architects, such as the Los Angeles Investment Company, Postle & Postle, R. F. Ruck, Paul Haynes, Leopold Fischer, H. Roy Kelley, Raphael Soriano, Charles W. Wong, Robert Earl, M.C. Drebbin, Vincent Palmer, Theodore Pletsch and Homer C. Valentine. It is also rumored that renowned African American architect, Paul Williams had built several homes in View Park. The only documented Paul Williams home in View Park is located on Mount Vernon Drive.

    National Register of Historic Places

    On July 12, 2016 View Park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, an initiative led by View Park Conservancy in which almost 700 View Park residents donated over $100,000 to complete the tedious historic work needed to complete the neighborhood's nomination. View Park is the largest National Register historic district in the Country based on African American and county history, and the largest in California in terms of total property owners.

    Windsor Hills

    Windsor Hills was developed in the late 1930s by Marlow-Burns Development Company and targeted the high upper-class neighborhood akin to the style of Bel-Air and Beverly Glen. It was the first subdivision in Southern California for which the newly created Federal Housing Administration provided mortgage insurance. It also contains a collection of houses and mansions in the Spanish Colonial and Mediterranean styles. African-Americans were forbidden to live in either area until the Supreme Court's invalidation of racial restrictive covenants in 1948.

    These are the ten neighborhoods in Los Angeles County with the largest percentage of black residents:

    View Park-Windsor Hills, California, 86.5%
    Gramercy Park, Los Angeles, 86.4%
    Leimert Park, Los Angeles, 79.6%
    Manchester Square, Los Angeles, 78.6%
    Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw, Los Angeles, 71.3%
    Ladera Heights, California, 71%
    Hyde Park, Los Angeles, 66%
    Chesterfield Square, Los Angeles, 58.6%
    West Rancho Dominguez, California, 57.6%
    Westmont, California, 57.5%

    Parks and recreation
    View Park- Windsor Hills has a main park called Rueben Ingold Park, The park opened on August 17, 1971 and is adjacent to Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area with the newly Stocker Trail Corridor pathway to connect the two. Residents also use the Valley Ridge Ave hill for exercising.

    Education
    Schools

    Windsor Hills neighborhood sign
    The CDP community is within the Los Angeles Unified School District. A portion is also within the Inglewood Unified School District.

    Several elementary schools serve the LAUSD portion of community are as follows:

    54th Street Elementary School (K-5) (View Park)
    Cowan Elementary School (1–5)[citation needed]
    Windsor Math/Science/Aerospace Magnet, 5215 Overdale Drive. (K-5, zoned only for Kindergarten) (Windsor Hills)
    All areas in LAUSD are zoned to:

    Middle school
    Audubon Middle School

    High schools
    Crenshaw High School

    View Park Preparatory High School

    Some areas are jointly zoned to Audubon Middle School and Daniel Webster Middle School.

    Some areas are jointly zoned to Audubon Middle School, Orville Wright Middle School, and Palms Middle School. Some areas are jointly zoned to Crenshaw High School and Westchester High School. View Park Preparatory High School also serves as the center school for the View Park neighborhood. The school is an urban preparatory school partnered with LAUSD.

    Landmarks

    Ray Charles Residence at 4863 Southridge Avenue. The home was built in 1965.
    The Googie-style Wich Stand now known as Simply Wholesome is located at Slauson Avenue and Overhill Avenue.
    The Doumakes House. The first historic landmark in unincorporated LA County at Angeles Vista Blvd and West Blvd.

    View Park-Windsor Hills has been home to numerous actors, athletes, Filmmakers and musicians, including:

    Angelle Brooks, Actress
    Charles Burnett, Filmmaker and director
    Bebe Moore Campbell, Novelist
    Ray Charles, (1930–2004) Late Singer
    Doria Ragland, mother of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex
    James Cleveland (1931–1991) Gospel Singer, Arranger Composer
    Michael Cooper, Former NBA player and WNBA head coach
    Loretta Devine, Actress
    Curt Flood Former professional baseball player
    Lita Gaithers, Tony Award-nominated playwright, singer/songwriter
    Lisa Gay Hamilton, Actress
    Sally Hampton, Writer, Producer, Actress
    Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Journalist, Author and Broadcaster
    Louis Johnson, baseball player
    Regina King, Academy award winning Actress and television director 
    Mike Love, Musician, founding member of the Beach Boys
    Stan Love (basketball), Former NBA player, brother of Mike Love, cousin of Brian Wilson, founding member of the Beach Boys
    Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Retired Actress, Member of The British Royal Family, and daughter of Doria Ragland
    Issa Rae, Writer, Actress, and Television Producer
    Leslie Sykes, KABC-TV news co-anchor
    Ike & Tina Turner, Recording duo
    Clara Ward, (1924–1973) Gospel singer
    Dave Waymer, NFL Football Player
    Gerald Wilson, jazz Composer, arranger, conductor
    Nancy Wilson, Vocalist
  • Windsor Hills


    View Park-Windsor Hills

    Overview of View Park-Windsor Hills Real Estate Trends

    Calculated using last month's statistics.

    Median List Price $1.08M

    Avg. Sale / List 94.2%

    Median List $/Sq Ft $476

    Avg. Number of Offers 1

    Median Sale Price $785K

    Avg. Down Payment 19.0%

    Median Sale $/Sq Ft $458

    The asking price of homes for sale in View Park-Windsor Hills has  since January last year, while the number of homes for sale has decreased 9.5%.

    View Park−Windsor Hills is an unincorporated community in Los Angeles County, California, United States. The View Park neighborhood is on the north end of the community along Angeles Vista Boulevard and the Windsor Hills neighborhood is on the southern end to the north of Slauson Avenue. 

    Zip code: 90043
    Area code: Area code 213
    Population: 11,075 (2010)

    View Park−Windsor Hills is one of the wealthiest primarily African-American neighborhoods in the United States. The two neighborhoods are part of a band of neighborhoods, from Culver City's Fox Hills district on the west to the Los Angeles neighborhood of Leimert Park on the east, that comprise the single largest and one of the wealthiest, best-educated, and geographically contiguous historically black communities in the western United States. This corridor also includes Baldwin Hills and Ladera Heights neighborhoods. It was founded in the late 1930s. While the neighborhood is still predominantly African-American, the area is undergoing a demographic shift, as new homeowners (mostly Caucasian, Asian families), who work in nearby Culver City, Downtown Los Angeles, Santa Monica and other job hub areas are moving into the neighborhood.

    For statistical purposes, the United States Census Bureau has defined View Park−Windsor Hills as a census-designated place (CDP). The census definition of the area may not precisely correspond to local understanding of the area. The population of the CDP was 11,075 at the  U.S. census.

    History

    View Park

    View Park was developed between 1923-1970 as a high-upper-class neighborhood akin to the style of Cheviot Hills, Bel-Air, Brentwood, Carthay Circle, and Studio City by the Los Angeles Investment Company.Along with neighboring Ladera Heights and Baldwin Hills, it is one of the wealthiest African-American areas in the United States. It contains a collection of houses and mansions in the Spanish Colonial and Mediterranean styles, most of which remain today. View Park architecture features the work of many notable architects, such as the Los Angeles Investment Company, Postle & Postle, R. F. Ruck, Paul Haynes, Leopold Fischer, H. Roy Kelley, Raphael Soriano, Charles W. Wong, Robert Earl, M.C. Drebbin, Vincent Palmer, Theodore Pletsch and Homer C. Valentine. It is also rumored that renowned African American architect, Paul Williams had built several homes in View Park. The only documented Paul Williams home in View Park is located on Mount Vernon Drive.

    National Register of Historic Places

    On July 12, 2016 View Park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, an initiative led by View Park Conservancy in which almost 700 View Park residents donated over $100,000 to complete the tedious historic work needed to complete the neighborhood's nomination. View Park is the largest National Register historic district in the Country based on African American and county history, and the largest in California in terms of total property owners.

    Windsor Hills

    Windsor Hills was developed in the late 1930s by Marlow-Burns Development Company and targeted the high upper-class neighborhood akin to the style of Bel-Air and Beverly Glen. It was the first subdivision in Southern California for which the newly created Federal Housing Administration provided mortgage insurance. It also contains a collection of houses and mansions in the Spanish Colonial and Mediterranean styles. African-Americans were forbidden to live in either area until the Supreme Court's invalidation of racial restrictive covenants in 1948.

    These are the ten neighborhoods in Los Angeles County with the largest percentage of black residents:

    View Park-Windsor Hills, California, 86.5%
    Gramercy Park, Los Angeles, 86.4%
    Leimert Park, Los Angeles, 79.6%
    Manchester Square, Los Angeles, 78.6%
    Baldwin Hills/Crenshaw, Los Angeles, 71.3%
    Ladera Heights, California, 71%
    Hyde Park, Los Angeles, 66%
    Chesterfield Square, Los Angeles, 58.6%
    West Rancho Dominguez, California, 57.6%
    Westmont, California, 57.5%

    Parks and recreation
    View Park- Windsor Hills has a main park called Rueben Ingold Park, The park opened on August 17, 1971 and is adjacent to Kenneth Hahn State Recreation Area with the newly Stocker Trail Corridor pathway to connect the two. Residents also use the Valley Ridge Ave hill for exercising.

    Education
    Schools

    Windsor Hills neighborhood sign
    The CDP community is within the Los Angeles Unified School District. A portion is also within the Inglewood Unified School District.

    Several elementary schools serve the LAUSD portion of community are as follows:

    54th Street Elementary School (K-5) (View Park)
    Cowan Elementary School (1–5)[citation needed]
    Windsor Math/Science/Aerospace Magnet, 5215 Overdale Drive. (K-5, zoned only for Kindergarten) (Windsor Hills)
    All areas in LAUSD are zoned to:

    Middle school
    Audubon Middle School

    High schools
    Crenshaw High School

    View Park Preparatory High School

    Some areas are jointly zoned to Audubon Middle School and Daniel Webster Middle School.

    Some areas are jointly zoned to Audubon Middle School, Orville Wright Middle School, and Palms Middle School. Some areas are jointly zoned to Crenshaw High School and Westchester High School. View Park Preparatory High School also serves as the center school for the View Park neighborhood. The school is an urban preparatory school partnered with LAUSD.

    Landmarks

    Ray Charles Residence at 4863 Southridge Avenue. The home was built in 1965.
    The Googie-style Wich Stand now known as Simply Wholesome is located at Slauson Avenue and Overhill Avenue.
    The Doumakes House. The first historic landmark in unincorporated LA County at Angeles Vista Blvd and West Blvd.

    View Park-Windsor Hills has been home to numerous actors, athletes, Filmmakers and musicians, including:

    Angelle Brooks, Actress
    Charles Burnett, Filmmaker and director
    Bebe Moore Campbell, Novelist
    Ray Charles, (1930–2004) Late Singer
    Doria Ragland, mother of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex
    James Cleveland (1931–1991) Gospel Singer, Arranger Composer
    Michael Cooper, Former NBA player and WNBA head coach
    Loretta Devine, Actress
    Curt Flood Former professional baseball player
    Lita Gaithers, Tony Award-nominated playwright, singer/songwriter
    Lisa Gay Hamilton, Actress
    Sally Hampton, Writer, Producer, Actress
    Earl Ofari Hutchinson, Journalist, Author and Broadcaster
    Louis Johnson, baseball player
    Regina King, Academy award winning Actress and television director 
    Mike Love, Musician, founding member of the Beach Boys
    Stan Love (basketball), Former NBA player, brother of Mike Love, cousin of Brian Wilson, founding member of the Beach Boys
    Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, Retired Actress, Member of The British Royal Family, and daughter of Doria Ragland
    Issa Rae, Writer, Actress, and Television Producer
    Leslie Sykes, KABC-TV news co-anchor
    Ike & Tina Turner, Recording duo
    Clara Ward, (1924–1973) Gospel singer
    Dave Waymer, NFL Football Player
    Gerald Wilson, jazz Composer, arranger, conductor
    Nancy Wilson, Vocalist
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